WARRANTS ALERT

Published by The McHattie Group

Available by Subscription

Published every month since October 1989, Warrants Alert offers subscribers a unique insight into investment trust warrants, subscription shares, covered warrants, and other geared instruments. All types of warrant listed on the London Stock Exchange are included. The newsletter is written by the well-known warrants expert Andrew McHattie, our editor since inception. He includes detailed analysis and specific buy, sell and hold advice. His research includes information from many sources including his proprietorial warrant models. We believe the newsletter is essential for all warrant investors, and that no private investor can hope to match our ability for unearthing the best opportunities.

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We hope subscribers may be able to recoup the cost of the subscription with just one successful warrant investment.  Gresham House warrants, one of our recommendations, have risen by 210% in the last year (to 29th August 2018).  This illustrates the potential, but of course not all warrants perform so well, and some have fallen in value over the same period.

JUST SOME OF THE WARRANTS WE COVER

Apple, Fidelity Asian Values, Geiger Counter, Golden Prospect Precious Metals, Gresham House, HSBC, Landscape Acquisition, Lloyds Banking Group, Man Group, Marks & Spencer, Myanmar Investments, Prudential, RBS, Raven Property Group, Rio Tinto, Royal Dutch Shell, Vodafone.

Investment Trust Newsletter provides unique insight from our manager meetings and the stockbrokers’ research we receive.

CONTACT DETAILS AND RISK WARNING

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The McHattie Group, St Brandon’s House, 

29 Great George Street, Bristol, BS1 5QT.  Tel: 0117 407 0225.  

email: enquiries@mchattie.co.uk

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Warning: you should not buy shares or warrants with money you cannot afford to lose. This web site is intended for UK investors. Options and other derivatives, warrants, and margined transactions. This warning notice draws your attention to some of the high risks associated with warrants. The risks attaching to instruments and transactions of this kind are usually different from, and can be much greater than, those attached to securities such as shares, loan stock and bonds, such transactions often having the characteristics of speculation as opposed to investment. Warrants may involve a high degree of 'gearing' or 'leverage'. This means that a small movement in the price of the underlying asset may have a disproportionately dramatic effect on your investment. A relatively small adverse movement in the price of the underlying asset can result in the loss of the whole of your original investment. Moreover, because of the limited life of warrants, they may expire worthless. A warrant is a right to subscribe for shares, debentures, loan stock or government securities, usually exercisable against the original issuer of the securities. Because of the high degree of gearing which they may involve, the prices of warrants can be volatile. Accordingly, you should not buy warrants with money you cannot afford to lose. You run an extra risk of losing money when you buy shares in certain smaller companies including ‘penny shares’. There is a big difference between the buying price and the selling price of these shares. If you have to sell them immediately, you may get back much less than you paid for them. The price may change quickly, it may go down as well as up, and you may not get back the full amount invested. It may be difficult to sell or realise the investment. Because of the volatile nature of the investment, a fall in its value could result in your recovering nothing at all. Changes in rates of exchange may have an adverse effect on the value or price of the investment in sterling terms. As with other investments, transactions in warrants, shares, and investment trusts may also have tax consequences and on these you should consult your tax adviser. We have taken all reasonable care to ensure that all statements of fact and opinion contained on this site are fair and accurate in all material respects. Investors should seek appropriate professional advice if any points are unclear. This site is intended to give general advice only, and the investments mentioned are not necessarily suitable for any individual. It is possible that officers of the McHattie Group may have a beneficial holding in any of the securities mentioned. Published by The McHattie Group, St Brandon's House, 29 Great George Street, Bristol, BS1 5QT. Tel: 0117 407 0225. E-mail: enquiries@mchattie.co.uk. All rights reserved. No part of this site may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, or otherwise without the prior permission of the copyright holder. The McHattie Group offers restricted advice on certain investments only. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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Data and privacy policy: for subscribers and all enquiries, we will retain your data for the purpose of sending you our products, or details of our products, and we will retain those details indefinitely in order to offer you renewals, offers from our business, and any other products we think may be of interest to you. We will not sell or otherwise distribute your data to third parties. We take all reasonable precautions to ensure the security of personal data stored on our system, which is only accessible to staff of The McHattie Group. You should contact us if you wish your details to be removed from our database.

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Securitised Derivatives: these instruments may give you a time-limited right to acquire or sell one or more types of instrument which is normally exercisable against someone other than the issuer of that investment. Or they may give you rights under a contract for differences which allow for speculation on fluctuations in the value of the property of any description or an index, such as the FTSE 100 Index. In both cases, the investment or property may be referred to as the “underlying instrument.” These instruments often involve a high degree of gearing or leverage, so that a relatively small movement in the price of the underlying investment results in a much larger movement, favourable or unfavourable, in the price of the instrument. The price of these instruments can therefore be volatile. These instruments have a limited life, and may (unless there is some form of guaranteed return to the amount you are investing in the product) expire worthless if the underlying instrument does not perform as expected. You should only buy this product if you are prepared to sustain a total loss of the money you have invested plus any commission or other transaction charges.You should consider carefully whether or not this product is suitable for you in light of your circumstances and financial position, and if in any doubt please seek professional advice.